execution-plans

Find the Scalar Function Call: What it Means If It's Hiding in Probe Residual

Find the Scalar Function Call: What it Means If It's Hiding in Probe Residual

User defined functions are fairly simple to create in SQL Server, but figuring out exactly how they are being used can take a little time - even in a simple execution plan. This is because the functions can be tucked away into lots of different operators in the plan, even join operators.

The good news: once you learn what to look for, it’s not terribly complicated. There are some fancy terms involved, but the definitions are pretty simple.

Adaptive Queries in Standard Edition: Interleaved Exec for Multi-Statement TVFs

Adaptive Queries in Standard Edition: Interleaved Exec for Multi-Statement TVFs

It’s tough to keep track of which features work in each version of SQL Server, and which Editions support them.

My memory told me that the new Adaptive Joins feature in SQL Server 2017 was Enterprise Edition only…  and that’s correct, but I didn’t realize that the fancy new feature to make Multi-Statement TVFs smarter has much wider licensing.

Do Index Changes Remove Execution Plans from Cache?

Do Index Changes Remove Execution Plans from Cache?

When you modify the indexes on a table, SQL Server needs to reconsider how it executes queries that reference that table. But the way this appears when you’re looking at your execution plan cache is far from obvious: Impacted query plans are NOT removed from cache at the time you change an index. The next time the query is executed, it will be recompiled, and the new plan and related execution information will be placed in cache.