tsql

Table Value Constructors in TSQL

Table Value Constructors in TSQL

Last week’s quiz was on Table Value Constructors in TSQL.

Table value constructors let you create a dataset on the fly. These can occasionally be useful in writing queries, but I think playing with them has another benefit: they provide a simple, lightweight framework to let you develop your ability to think in sets.

CROSS APPLY in T-SQL: Why to APPLY

CROSS APPLY in T-SQL: Why to APPLY

Michelle asked a great question:

In your own words, why would one want to use a cross apply operator rather than a join operator? I’m old school, and I’m just not getting why a cross apply would be so much better to use than a join.

The BREAK Keyword in Transact SQL

The BREAK Keyword in Transact SQL

BREAK is a useful piece of control-of-flow language in SQL Server, but it only works in specific situations. Break Questions, Answers, and Explanations 1) If you run this code in a SQL Server Management Studio session, what will appear in the Messages window? BREAK; PRINT 2; Answer: Msg 135, Level 15, State 1, Line 6 Cannot use a BREAK statement outside the scope of a WHILE statement. How’d people do?
Using RETURN in Transact SQL: Quiz Results

Using RETURN in Transact SQL: Quiz Results

RETURN is a “control of flow” language keyword in Transact-SQL. It’s very useful for managing when code does – and does NOT – get executed in procedural code, and it can also be used to communicate the status from procedural code.

But not everyone knows how to use RETURN, and learning about it can be awkward because of some quirks of SQL Server Management Studio. It is well worth taking the time to get used to it, though!

ORDER BY, OFFSET, and Fetch in TSQL

ORDER BY, OFFSET, and Fetch in TSQL

My most recent Quizletter featured a quiz on ORDER BY in TSQL, complete with questions on the OFFSET and FETCH clauses which we got in SQL Server 2012.

One great thing about teaching TSQL School is that it reminds me of these cool options that can be easy to forget.