table-partitioning

Adding Partitions to the Lower End of a Left Based Partition Function

Adding Partitions to the Lower End of a Left Based Partition Function

I recently got a table partitioning question from a reader:

We now need to load some historical data into the table for 2013 so I want to alter the function and schema to add monthly partitions for this. But I can’t work out how to do this using SPLIT? Every example and tutorial I’ve looked at shows how to add new partitions onto the end of a range, not split one in the middle.

Understanding Left vs. Right Partition Functions (with Diagrams)

Understanding Left vs. Right Partition Functions (with Diagrams)

You’re designing table partitioning, or you want to make a change to an existing partition function. It’s critical to understand the difference between how “left” and “right” partition functions behave, but the documentation is a bit confusing on this topic.

SPLIT in a LEFT Partition Function: Where Does the Above-Boundary Data Go?

SPLIT in a LEFT Partition Function: Where Does the Above-Boundary Data Go?

Table partitioning seems simple, but there’s a lot of complexity in designing and managing it if you decide to use filegroups and splitting.

When you first implement partitioning in this scenario, you decide where you’re going to keep “out of bound” data when you create your partition scheme. Be careful when you make that decision, because it may not be easy to change later.

Sliding Window Table Partitioning: What to Decide Before You Automate

Sliding Window Table Partitioning: What to Decide Before You Automate

Before you do all the work to map out a complex sliding window table partitioning scheme for your SQL Server tables, here’s the top five questions I’d think through carefully: 1) Do You Need Table Partitioning? Some folks think they need partitioning for performance– but it really shines as a data management feature. Just because you’ve got tables with millions of rows in them doesn’t necessarily mean that partitioning will make queries faster.